Adding users

As environment administrator, you can add users via the user management menu that can be found by clicking on your name, in the upper right corner of the screen.

You have to go through the following steps

Step 1: Create a user account

Create a new user account by clicking on the + symbol

If you have create a lot of user accounts, it may be a good idea to import these via Excel. Read here for how to do that.

Step 2: Fill in the user’s details

Add details for the account that you want to create:

  • Name: the person’s name (will, for example, be used in Comment section)
  • Email: the person’s email address.
  • User name: the name that has to be used for logging into the application.

Please note: the new user account is added as the last one on the list. So, in case of a long list, go to the last page to see the newly added account.

Please note: if users have access to multiple environments, make sure that they have a unique user name for each environment.

Step 3: Select environment role

Define the user’s role on an environment level. In short, you have the following possibilities:

  • Project participant (this is the default): can edit or view data of specific projects.
  • Environment editor: can create new projects and see all other projects.
  • Environment administrator: same as above, but can also do user management.

Click here for a more detailed explanation of the different roles.

Step 4: Select project role

Define the user’s role on a project level. In short, you have the following possibilities:

  • Not linked to project (this is the default): cannot see the project (unless your are an environment administrator or environment editor)
  • Owner: can edit everything and can publish different versions of the project.
  • Editor: can edit requirements, analysis, verification plan, verification outcome, RFC (request), and RFC (assessment), depending on selection.
  • Viewer all versions, with comments: can view all project versions and add comments.
  • Viewer all versions: can view all project versions.
  • Viewer published versions: can only view published versions of the project.

Click here for a more detailed explanation of the different roles.

Step 5: Send invitation

Send the invite to the user by clicking on the mail icon. The e-mail contains the user name, a link for (re)setting a password, and a link to the application.

Some examples

As you understand from the above, there are quite number of possibilities. See below for a couple of practical examples for how you can assign roles, both within a project and within an organization.

Example 1: roles within a simple project

In a simple building project, user roles could be assigned as follows:

Actor NeedBriefBuilder Role
Project leader Starts the project and is ‘editor-in-chief’ of the overall set of requirements. Responsible for publishing/access/change management. Project owner
Briefing consultantNeeds to be able to add/edit requirements in the modelEditor-requirements
Architect/
engineers
Needs to be able to see all the requirements and should be able to make comments (e.g. asking for clarifications or changes per object)Viewer with comments

Example 2: roles within a complex project

In a more complex project, with a rigorous approach to quality control, user roles could be assigned as follows:

ActorNeedBriefBuilder Role
Requirements managerStarts the project and is ‘editor-in-chief’ of the overall set of requirements. Responsible for publishing/access/change management. Project owner
Requirement specialist Needs to be able to add/edit requirements to specific parts of the modelEditor-requirements
Verification/quality managerNeeds to be able to develop a verification plan, defining how, when and by whom requirements will be verifiedEditor – verification plan
Architect/engineerNeeds to be see able to see all the requirements and should be able to analyse and verify requirements.Editor – analysis + verification
External stakeholder (e.g. users)Needs to be able to see all requirements and should be able to make commentsViewer with comments

Example 3: roles within an organisation

In an organisation that uses BriefBuilder for multiple projects (e.g. a professional construction client or an engineering firm), the following roles will be relevant:

ActorNeedBriefBuilder
Role
Consultant/
expert
Needs to be able to start up (or clone) projects, and should be able to see the projects of colleagues (for knowledge sharing).Environment editor
BriefBuilder administratorNeeds to be to be able to see and do everything in the BriefBuilder environment to support the people working with it.Environment administrator
Ad-hoc project collaboratorDoes not need to see everything. Will be invited on a project-by-project basis.Project participant

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